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The system wasn’t built for an era of routine shutdowns. It pits the Antideficiency Act against a key labor law.

Originally published in The Washington Post on January 11, 2019.
By Todd Dickey, Assistant Professor of Public Administration at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School.

The current federal government shutdown has just tied the longest in United States history. For 21 days, more than 400,000 federal employees have worked without pay. As they will keep doing, indefinitely.

They have no choice. Their jobs are classified as vital to a basic level of government functioning. The requirement to report to work without knowing when they will be paid is both a condition and the reality of their employment. Furloughed employees might (within ethics guidelines) labor elsewhere during the shutdown so they can put food on their tables and gas in their tanks and keep the lights on. But the “excepted” workers are already occupied. Eric Young, president of the union that represents federal prison workers, told the Atlantic that this “constitutes involuntary servitude.” (more…)

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Louis Kriesberg and Robert A. Rubinstein prepared the statement, gathered the signers, raised funds for the  ad by GofundMe, and placed the ad in USA Today.  It was published  December 14, 2018 in USA Today, p. 2, in weekend, District of Columbia, edition.

FOR BETTER FOREIGN POLICIES

The foreign policy actions of President Donald J. Trump and his administration are damaging the United States. Abruptly and unilaterally breaking off long-standing commitments is counter-productive and picking fights with other governments, including allies, reduces U.S. bargaining power and is often self destructive. (more…)

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Originally posted November 30, 2017 on  BlogActiv and shared with PARCC by guest author Mark Temnycky, graduate of Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

As Ukraine celebrated its “Ukrainian Literacy and Language Day” on 9 November, controversy surrounding its education law remains.  Passed in September, the legislation stated secondary education in public schools would be taught in Ukrainian. This sparked outrage from the ethnic Russian community in eastern Ukraine, who represent nearly one-fifth of the Ukrainian populace, and the minority groups in Transcarpathia, such as the Hungarians and Romanians, who account for 0.6% of Ukraine’s population. (more…)

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Co-authored by Louis Kriesberg and Bruce W. Dayton
Originally posted on the Huffington Post on 12/12/16

With the election of Donald Trump to the U.S. presidency, it may be hard to recall the heady few years starting in 1989, when Americans could reasonably believe that the United States and the world in general were entering an enduring period of widespread peace. The Cold War had ended without violence as did Soviet domination of countries in Eastern Europe. The generally peaceful break-up of the Soviet Union coincided with a negotiated end to proxy wars in Central America and elsewhere. In South Africa, the struggle to end apartheid was successful, again without feared bloodshed between whites and blacks. Neighboring civil wars in Namibia, Mozambique, and Angola ended with negotiated agreements after protracted violence. The long-lasting fight about the status of Northern Ireland was settled. The UN became much more effectively engaged in interventions in civil wars, diplomatically and with peacekeeping forces, leading many to hope that the end of the Cold War had given way to a new era of global cooperation. (more…)

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By Miriam Elman

(Re-published from Legal Insurrection | Nov. 13, 2016) President-elect Donald Trump campaigned on a promise that the United States would officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital city of the Jewish state.

He also vowed that when he became president he’d relocate the U.S. embassy from its current beachside location in Tel Aviv to the Holy City.

“Presidents have been relying on a national security waiver built into a 1995 law, which gets used at regular six month intervals and gives them an opportunity to suspend the embassy move.”

Now, some are saying that once he’s in the Oval Office, Trump will go back on his word. (more…)

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Israeli academics are being quietly ostracized by their U.S. peers, not out of principle, but out of fear of pro-boycott colleagues. I hope our challenge to BDS-by-stealth at Syracuse U will encourage more campuses to take on their boycott bullies.

Miriam F. Elman Sep 07, 2016 12:03 PM

Back in July, Ben-Gurion University President Rivka Carmi expressed concern about a “growing and worrisome phenomena”: informal boycotts of her faculty. BGU scholars were telling her of being quietly shunned by colleagues—excluded from conferences, getting their research proposals and manuscripts summarily rejected, and finding it difficult to place their graduate students into post-doctoral appointments. (more…)

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By Ahmed Hezam Al-Yemeni
This post was originally published at Peace Direct, where he is an Insight on Conflict’s Local Peacebuilding Expert for Yemen.  Click here to read the original post.  

30 August 2016: Peace Direct’s Local Peacebuilding Expert for Yemen is Ahmed Al-Yemeni. He recently returned home after 12 months abroad. In this harrowing dispatch, he describes the trail of devastation he followed, all the way to his family village.

Following Yemen’s war from a distance is not like living it. Touching and feeling the agony and suffering of Yemenis, as well as hearing the airstrikes and visiting the areas targeted, is epic and dramatic. It is also full of blood, and the cries of those killed and injured. It is a dark portrait, with many destroyed schools, hospitals, bridges, and public infrastructure, destroyed for unclear reasons and a strategic vision that no one can understand or justify. (more…)

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